Canned food on the Oregon Trail

December 19th, 2016 8:36 AM
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I've seen Apple II software take a variety of forms: be it original, emulated, or interpreted, the computer's iconic palette and icons have shown up on televisions, subway murals, 404 pages, theatrical stages, and more.

But this one is new to me. Even though I've heard of programming "on the metal", I didn't know the metal could be aluminum:

Canstruction

This Rev. 0 Apple II playing Oregon Trail is the product of a recent fundraiser in Texas. From the event page:

Using only canned food items, Canstruction participants are challenged to create innovative structures that will be displayed in a giant art exhibition throughout the 2016 State Fair. Canstruction is a unique charity that hosts competitions across the nation to showcase colossal canned masterpieces. At the end of the competition, all canned food will be donated to the North Texas Food Bank.

Writes the AG&E Structural Engenuity team:

The iconic Apple IIe was the first computer experience for millions of students, educators and professionals. This canstructure aims to capture the style of the machine, along with the Oregon Trail software that made players think about issues that faced 19th century American settlers—including disease, extreme weather and hunger.

Although this particular team didn't raise any funds, their contribution nonetheless calls attention to an important issue. As these artists stated, "Society has come a long way [since the Oregon Trail], but hunger is still an age-old problem that we must continually address." Despite what some critics may say, food banks serve a vital function in our communities, especially during this cold holiday season. Find and support your local food bank — preferably with cash, not canned food.

(Hat tip to Bob Minteer via Open Apple)

Apple II at the National Videogame Museum

April 11th, 2016 10:59 AM
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PAX East, the annual video game convention that attracts 70,000 gamers to my native Boston, is next week. While I'm eager to attend PAX's 2016 iteration with Juiced.GS associate editor Andy Molloy, I was recently surprised by the conclusion to a chain of events that prompted me to recall our time at PAX East 2013.

It started last week when I received a Kickstarter update from The Videogame History Museum. I'd backed this project to create a physical museum for video games, computers, and machines back in 2011; this update was the first peep I'd heard from the project since 2012. I'd honestly forgotten it was a thing, but here was news that the project had been realized, and the doors had opened on their space at 8004 Dallas Parkway, Frisco, Texas.

Texas is a long way from Boston, so rather than check the place out for myself, I sent the news to two KansasFest alumni from Texas: Mike Whalen and Michael Sternberg. I should've known they'd be on top of a museum opening in their own backyard, as sure enough, they were quick to respond that they'd attended the opening weekend. Whalen further sent along some photos that he hadn't found a place to host. I offered to publish them on Gamebits but recommended that, in the meantime, he share the photo of the museum's Apple II with the Apple II Enthusiasts group on Facebook.

Up went the photo… which looked familiar to fellow Bostonian Paul Hagstrom. "I think that's actually the very system that Wayne, Ken, and I put together," he remarked.

Apple II at the National Videogame Museum

Photo courtesy Mike Whalen.

Omigosh — he was correct! I didn't immediately recognize it, but that Apple II was donated by Wayne Arthurton, with joystick and monitor by Paul, physically transported to PAX East 2013 by T.J. Awrey, and coordinated by me as a donation to the Videogame History Museum. Look!

Donated

I'm awaiting official confirmation that this is indeed the same system, but given that it's the same organization at both PAX East 2013 and in Frisco, Texas, I believe it is. Three years ago, I wrote, "The Apple II was not just a temporary exhibit for PAX East; it has been permanently donated to the Videogame History Museum and will make appearances at conferences and conventions throughout the country, such as the Game Developers Conference, MAGFest, and PAX Prime." But I never imagined that it would become a literal museum piece. How amazing that a donation that was intended to benefit a single event will now be preserved for all time.

Now I know not to expect its appearance at next week's PAX East 2016, but in the meantime, you can read the original blog post from 2013:

Apple II at PAX East 2013

Buy Richard Garriott's house

October 20th, 2011 12:58 PM
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Britannia may be the fictional setting of the Ultima game series, but that shouldn't stop you from buying property there. For the cool sum of $4.1 million USD, Brittania Manor, the home of Richard Garriott, aka Lord British, can be yours.

Located at 8207 Two Coves Drive in Austin, Texas, the 5,900-square-foot mansion, currently for sale through RE/MAX, features all the essential amenities, including a pool, an observatory, a grotto, a waterfall, a sauna, a gazebo, and a five-car garage. The castle, built in 1987, appears to be in an excellent state of upkeep.

Britannia Manor is famous for its biennial haunted mansions, for which Mr. Garriott spared no expense. But assuming the house isn't truly haunted, it raises the question: why is the house for sale? Surely someone who can afford a trip to outer space isn't hurting for money. Maybe Mr. Garriott needs to fund his geocaching adventures?

(Hat tip to Jason Scott and Nathan Bernier)