Vince Briel talks with Racketboy


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1 comment.

Since the Apple-1 has been making headlines lately, it seems timely to hear from the man who's helped revitalize interest in this historic machine. Vince Briel is the creator of the Replica I, a fully functional Apple-1 clone authorized by Steve Wozniak himself. The unit sells as a kit of 88 unassembled parts for $149, or as an assembled, ready-to-use circuit board for $199. Both options make it a significantly more affordable alternative than buying one at Christie's auction house.

Vince is no stranger to the pages of magazine Juiced.GS, where he was interviewed by Doug Cuff in 2004, with Andy Molloy's review of the Apple-1 replica following four years later — a topic I myself then tackled for Computerworld.com in 2009. Vince was also part of a five-person roundtable in what remains one of my most memorable Juiced.GS issues to date.

Briel's latest interview, however, is not in print, but in podcast, and not even in one of the many aimed at an Apple II audience. Instead, Vince was a guest of Racketboy.com, "an independent video game site that caters to the old-school console gamer and their unique gaming lifestyles." The show's guests were decided by reader vote, with Vince being of sufficient reputation to make the cut. The interview was published this past January and is an entertaining listen, revealing details about the creation of the Replica I, Vince's interactions with Woz, the product's timeless popularity, and upcoming products, including an MP3 card.

Although the podcast is available via iTunes, this particular episode is not, so you'll have to download the MP3 manually to add it to your audio collection. It's worth this simple effort to hear from one of the Apple II community's leading hardware developers.

  1. Nice interview with Mr. Briel. It was a little funny hearing the question asked about available games for the Apple-1. I'm sure that SOMETHING was available, but with the Apple-1 video emulating (essentially) a teletype, you would be limited to games like "Hunt The Wumpus", which just printed a couple of lines and waited for input. Screen-addressable games, even text-only ones, were just not possible on the hardware.